About Us

We are experts in inheriting violins. Like many folks we had a parent who loved violins and his passion was violins. Many folks may inherit one or two violins. We get a lot of mail from those who spot a violin at an estate sale or a flea market and buy it with high expectations. Well, we inherited over 60 violins so you can imagine how we felt.

If you inherit or find one or two violins, you are motivated to do a little research into violins. With 60 we were highly motivated to learn about violins. I was newly retired and this seemed like a worthy project to focus my free time on. As it turns out I have done much of your homework for you. This site should answer many of your questions about antique violins you have found and point you at higher authorities on violins if you wish to carry your research further.

For us the first order of business was to appraise the collection and figure out if there was financial wisdom in repairing the violins on an individual basis. This is where we learned the basic formula described in our Appraise your Violin page. This is the core of what you need to know. The rest of the site follows two themes. First is a bit more information on the Families that set the standard for what a violin should be and the history of violins. The second theme is that we give a fact sheet on each of the violins in the collection, show some pictures of each of the violins and add whatever information was gleaned from the inspection and repair of each violin. They are premium priced as they are “like new”. Some are possibly even better than when they were manufactured over 100 years ago. This helps with your imagining your ideal selling price for a violin. The first order of business was to appraise the collection and figure out if there was financial wisdom in repairing the violins on an individual basis.

This is where we learned the basic formula described in our Appraise your Violin page. This is the core of what we learned. The rest of the site follows two themes. First is a bit more information on the Families that set the standard for violins and the history of violins. Secondly we give a fact sheet on each of the violins in the collection, show some pictures of each of the violins and add whatever information was gleaned from the inspection and repair of each violin. They are pictures of a violin repaired or restored to “like new” playable condition. They are premium priced as they are “like new”. Some are probably even better than when they were manufactured over 100 years ago.

All of the violins were in need of repair. Apparently there was no luthiery near to Mario so he did some small repairs. The problem is that if you do not have the skills of a trained violin maker, you can quickly do more damage than repair so he left them alone.

When we received them we put them up for repair with a highly recommended luthiery here in Vancouver, the now semi-retired Geza Burghaerdt of Granville Island.

Some were sold and the rest are here for sale. We are also looking for an outlet to possibly rent them as most are very nice student violins. They are all made from wood which makes them much more desirable than modern factory made violins as they simply have a better sound.

Motivation

One motivation was respect for the person who accumulated this collection and the desire to move the project ahead. The collection was accumulated because Mario Cesare loved violins. We have found many collections like this where a person loves violins so much that they accumulate this many violins. They buy, sell and upgrade their collection over time.

Our second motivation is to liquidate the collection or rent it out. No one in our house plays the violin so it makes sense to get these violins into the hands of those who will enjoy playing them. However it is tough as we need to receive what they are worth.

The violin community is a tight one in both definitions of the term. They are close knit and some members are down right arrogant and condescending. In their defence they are barraged by the negative reactions of folks who find a violin and think it is golden when it is not. They are also tight in that there is not a ton of money in violins. Since 2008 there are fewer and fewer luthieries and less money for paying musicians. Only the most business savvy are surviving and buying old instruments.

The bottom line is that we give you a chance to look at what you have, compare it to what it can be and then give you the analytical tools to sort out whether you have found a valuable instrument or one whose value is in the sentimental attachment that you had to the one you inherited the instrument from. This is a formula that can be applied to most collectibles.

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